52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 34 Recap

52ancestors-2015-34Is anyone else really confused about when we are?  Between school starting (which seems especially early this year), much cooler temperatures here in the Midwest (also early), and a “late” Labor Day, I am utterly confused as to when I am.

It didn’t help that my mom reminded me that Christmas is 4 months from this past Tuesday. Sigh.

The optional theme for Week 34 was “Non-population.” If you followed the theme, I hope you had as much fun digging into the non-population schedules as I always do!

Leave a comment with a link to your Week 34 post and a little bit about your ancestor. As always, take a look at Week 33’s posts. Be warned — there are some sad stories in the “Defective, Dependent, and Delinquent” theme.

(My writing this week was on my other blog: “How Quilting Is Like Genealogy” and “National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers: A Surprisingly Rich Resource.” In that one, I went into more detail with the record shown on the Bryan Cranston episode of Who Do You Think You Are?“)

Upcoming Optional Themes

    • Week 35 (August 27 – September 2) – School Days
    • Week 36 (September 3-9) – Working for a Living
    • Week 37 (September 10-16) – Large Family
    • Week 38 (September 17-23) – Favorite Place
    • Week 39 (September 24-30) – Unusual

If you need some ideas on how to approach September’s theme, I have some on the September themes announcement. (As always, the themes are optional. Write about whomever you want!)

30 thoughts on “52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 34 Recap

  1. Vera Marie Badertscher

    Samuel Frederick SCHNEITER, my husband’s 2x great grandfather.

    Although I’ve used the agriculture census many times for people on my mother’s side, I haven’t found any of my husband’s ancestors on the non-population census reports as yet. And anyhow, this week I’m talking about one of the Swiss ancestors who amazingly worked elsewhere than on a dairy farm.

    http://ancestorsinaprons.com/2015/08/52-ancestors-samuel-frederich-schneiter/

    I should mention that I got all excited about a dairy farm record that I thought was Ken’s great-grandfather, but then I calmed down and looked at the date and county again and realized it wasn’t the right person at all!

    Reply
  2. purslaneforever

    Two posts this week, the first of two about a truly great great-aunt Mame — “52 Ancestors: Mame MARSHALL Brown 1891-1987”

    https://woodsie4.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/52-ancestors-mame-marshall-brown-1891-1987-draft/

    And, a short post about her younger brother, Rev. Edmund P, Marshall, and a modern photo of the seminary where he studied for the priesthood — “Fr. Edmund MARSHALL – From Parisian Seminary to Small Town Parish, young priest finds his calling”

    https://woodsie4.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/fr-edmund-marshall-from-parisian-seminary-to-small-town-parish-young-priest-finds-his-calling-draft/

    Reply
  3. Cheryl Biermann Hartley

    WHIPPLE – WIPPEL

    I was able to locate the Pennsylvania agricultural schedules for the 1850 and 1880 federal censuses online through the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.

    Thomas and Adam Whipple – Here a Cow, There a Sheep: An Investigation into Non-population Schedules of the U.S. Censuses http://wp.me/p4ioO6-gE

    Reply
  4. Claudia Boorman

    Yes, not only am I confused about which week it is, but I’m a week behind due to another project, AND I took liberties with the theme for week 34 – instead of “non-population” I called in “no added population” (no children) and I wrote about my childless maternal great aunt:

    ANDREW, Ida Alice (1871-1956), a nurse who married late to a much younger Anglican minister in Winnipeg Manitoba and moved with him down to Omaha Nebraska.

    http://boormanfamily.weebly.com/blog/ida-alice-andrew-1871-1956-34-52-ancestors

    Reply

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